Hong Kong lawmakers arrested over democracy protests

Pro-democracy legislator Alan Leong talks to the media outside the Wanchai police station in Hong Kong, on March 2, 2015Hong Kong pro-democracy lawmakers were arrested and then released on Monday over their involvement in mass protests for free elections, the latest step in a widespread investigation that has been accused of seeking to intimidate activists. Albert Ho and Helena Wong, both of the Democratic Party, voluntarily turned themselves in at Wan Chai police headquarters Monday morning on the request of the police. Both were holding small paper yellow umbrellas -- the symbol of the democracy movement -- as they went into the police station while supporters carrying umbrellas and placards shouted "We want universal suffrage". "Today Albert Ho and myself were formally arrested," said Wong after she was released.



Ugandan President Museveni replaces finance, security ministers

Uganda's Finance Minister Kiwanuka holds a briefcase containing the Government Budget at the Serena conference center in the capital KampalaUgandan President Yoweri Museveni replaced his finance, security and transport ministers in a reshuffle on Sunday, which analysts said was aimed at rewarding his allies ahead of an election due early next year. Museveni, in power since 1986, is widely expected to seek re-election. In the reshuffle, Matia Kasaija, a junior finance minister was promoted to finance minister, replacing Maria Kiwanuka, who will become senior presidential adviser for finance. Charles Rwomushana, a political analyst, said the changes were also aimed at bringing politicians seen as sympathetic to Museveni's former prime minister, Amama Mbabazi, into the cabinet.



Near Fed majority backs June liftoff Yellen hasn't yet endorsed

U.S. Federal Reserve Chair Yellen testifies before a House Financial Services Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in WashingtonNot all of the seven who point to June vote this year on the Fed's ten-member policy setting committee, but all participate in policy discussions.     The Fed is likely at its March 17th and 18th policy meeting to remove language saying the central bank will take a "patient" approach to raising rates, taking away the final verbal constraint to a June rate hike, current and former Fed officials say.     "It's likely they remove 'patient' in March," said David Stockton, a former Fed research director now at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. "Even if Yellen might not, left to her own devices, be ready to move on rates, there is probably a growing sentiment that the time is getting closer."     The use of the word "patient" signals that the Fed would wait at least two more meetings before considering a rate hike. If the Fed later this month says it remains patient, then a June increase is off the table, likely pushing the decision to September when the Fed is scheduled to hold a press conference after its meeting.     Stockton said he personally expects a September liftoff.



Congo says kills rebels, gains ground in drive to crush insurgency

By Aaron Ross KINSHASA (Reuters) - The Congolese army has killed at least 10 rebel fighters and captured territory, weapons and men during its latest campaign to stamp out an insurgency in the east of the country, the government spokesman said on Sunday. Seven rebel fighters have been killed in fighting near the town of Tongo in North Kivu province since Saturday and a government soldier was also killed there, spokesman Lambert Mende told Reuters. They are abandoning the majority of their arms," spokesman Lambert Mende told Reuters. They have exploited the region's gold, diamond and tin deposits and waged periodic war with the Kinshasa government and other armed groups since fleeing to Congo at the end of the genocide.
Amish to be resentenced for remaining charges in attacks

FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2011 file photo, Sam Mullet Sr. stands in the front yard of his home in Bergholz, Ohio. Sixteen members of a breakaway Amish community from eastern Ohio are scheduled to be resentenced in Cleveland after a federal appellate court overturned their hate crime convictions. The resentencing Monday, March, 2, 2015, is needed because the original sentences for the 16 didn’t distinguish between their hate crimes convictions and convictions on other charges related to the forced cutting of beards and hair of seven people. All were members of other Ohio Amish communities. Eight of the 16 already have served their sentences and can’t be returned to prison. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta, File)CLEVELAND (AP) — Sixteen members of a breakaway Amish community from eastern Ohio are scheduled to be resentenced in Cleveland after a federal appellate court overturned their hate crime convictions.





Close Window